Gamache Series Open Discussion

Join us here in The Bistro for a discussion on the entire Gamache series. Feel free to ask or answer any questions about any of the books or the series as a whole.

Paul Hochman

Discussion on “Gamache Series Open Discussion

  1. Anna says:

    Interesting report on the Quais du Polar. It doesn’t mention Louise and the Art but there was an interesting comment at the bottom in the comments section. According to the report, the French love crime fiction but particularly in hard copy, not e book. The comment at the bottome says that crime fiction is something you read and then pass on. Me thinks she hasn’t read Louise Penny. Do you think that comment is true generally of crime fixtion? Is it just Louise that is different!

    http://www.crimefictionlover.com/2015/03/live-from-lyon-quais-du-polar-2015-special-report/

    • Millie says:

      I’ll have to read it again to properly give credit to who said what, but has the person who said they had only seen lines like that at Disneyland ever attend an annual Washington, DC book fair? Me thinks not!

      • Anna says:

        Oh wow. I have a feeling I will be attending a DC book fair some time in the near future! Something else to add to the “to do” list. Thanks Millie

  2. Anna says:

    I posted before I could proof read!

  3. Millie says:

    How do you find these things? You always amaze. And if I stopped to proof read everything before posting I just wouldn’t post.

  4. Gigi says:

    I have just been asked by my company to retire. Sad, but not totally true, since I am far from being ready for retirement. Just another chapter and new opportunity waiting around the corner. I did promise my husband to take some time to smell the roses since I forgot to do it for far too long. This is my first time to write a comment, so please be patient with me. I had the pleasure to meet and speak with Louise in Quebec City for a murder mystery weekend where her book was being featured as the topic for murder. Great weekend and would recommend it. What a wonderful lady you are Louise: funny, genuine and a person you wish you had as a friend. I also met Louise again at a book event in Oakville Ontario a few years ago. Each year I wait for the next book of Louise Penny and always purchase it on the first day of it’s release on my Kobo. I have signed books from Louise in my library. I read on my Kobo each night, when I wait for my turn at the doctor’s office, or when I go home to see my dentist who is in Coaticook. Crazy I know, but it gives me a excuse to go home and visit my brother in Sherbrooke and go to North Hatley to purchase a few more nice glasses on the second floor of the grocery store “Le Baron” and visit the little shops.
    When a book from Louise is released it is always a new surprise and treasure. If Three Pines really existed, I imagine it would be like North Hatley. This little town has changed since the wonderful Hatley Inn burned down, struggling, but it is still a wonderful place to visit each time I go home. I drive up the hill where the Inn was and with a heavy heart I wish it was still there, what a great place it was to stay. If I was rich, I would buy the land and rebuild that wonderful Inn just the way it was and would ask Louise to write a new book about it.
    I picked up a brick from the debris of the Inn’s sidewalk and put it in my garden with a piece of the white ramp which I will bring back with me when I return home for good in the Eastern Townships. I have lived in Ontario for the last 30 years, but home will always be home, and I may be back sooner than planned. But you never know what life brings your way. Enough of this for now, I wish Louise, you would release a new book every 6 months. A year is a very long time to wait for the next Gamache adventure. I love to read about Gamache and his relationship with Jean-Guy (please never separate these two it would never be the same). Will Gamache ever again be part of La Surete? I enjoy reading about the places featured in Louise’s books which take place in Quebec: St Benoit Du Lac, Quebec City etc. This is just to say that Louise is one of my favorite authors. What am I saying? She is my favorite author. Recently I purchased the mug, coaster and books from the bookstore Louise recommended in Lac Brome; nice little corner with the fireplace, great idea. Hope I did ok for my first try at posting a comment. Next time I will write in French since I will always be a little Quebecoise first and love la belle province de Quebec, there is no place like it anywhere. “A bientot” and happy reading for the next book of our dear author Louise Penny. Un beau bonjour a Louise. Gigi

    • Anna says:

      Welcome Gigi. Sad about your retirement if you were not ready but how wonderful that you see it as an opportunity. You just never know what awaits.

      I think we all find it a long time between books from Louise but we are lucky she has produced them so regularly so it is hard to complain. Especially as she has so many challenges and demands on her time. I am sure we are all grateful she has time to write at all.

      I am quite envious you have been able to meet Louise and visit the bookstore in Lac Brome. They are on my to visit list!

      We look forward to your next comment….my french is awful so you may have to provide a translation!

      • Gigi says:

        Dear Anna, so nice of you to reply to my comment. Did not know what to expect. What a great way to connect with new people. I really love all Louise’s books and I am very grateful for them as you said with all her challenges and dear Michael, what an amazing couple. She deserves all the very best.
        I was reading some of the comments and saw that you wrote a book, what is the title and where can I buy it?
        Wishing you ladies all the very best and thank you Anna for connecting with me. Gigi

  5. Millie says:

    Welcome to “the Bistro”, Gigi! How wonderful to have met Louise in person. And what a wonderful story you shared. So glad you did. You will find this little corner to be full of kind hearted, warm and caring people who love chatting about the things that interest us at any given moment. So don’t be too disconcerted if you find the topic changes seem “off topic.” I remember feeling very awkward at first and was told, “there are no ‘off topics’ among friends.” The other bit of very helpful info I received was to scroll up or back once in a while. Sometimes people comment right underneath and it’s easy to miss the new comments.
    I hope you feel as welcome as we feel ‘at home’ here. Please keep us posted on the new adventures you find along the way.

  6. Anna says:

    Hi Gigi. You will find a very friendly bunch here who are happy to chat at almost any hour. Because i live on the other side of the world I can keep the night owls company.

    I did write a book. If you are looking for something to while away the days until The Nature of the Beast please give it a try. Its called The Cove by Anna Leavy. Unfortunately it is only on Kindle so you will need the Kindle app to read it. I have not mastered all other forms of selling but Kindle was a way to show it to my friends here in the Bistro.

    Another good way to fill time is to read over the discussions from the previous books. They are all archived and accessible through the links on the right side of the page. I don’t know if people still make comment over there as we have continued on here in The Bistro but feel free to ask questions or make any comments you want. Of course, starting Monday there will be new discussions on the places that have inspired the Three Pines books. I think you will love that.

  7. Millie says:

    I’m giggling. I see you have already noticed what I meant by “there are no off topics among friends. Good for you jumping right in. Well, our dear Anna probably won’t want to respond to your question about her book. She’s terribly shy about it and still feels it’s too ‘off topic’, so I’ll respond for her because we are very proud of her. She says Louise’s books inspired her to attempt to write her own and received much encouragement from people here. As you can tell, those who have had an opportunity to finish it absolutely love it. Be forewarned tho, the setting is in a little coastal village in Australia, so the spelling is a bit different for some words. Other than that, if you love Louise’s books I’m pretty sure you’ll also like Anna’s. Enjoy!
    http://www.amazon.com/gp/aw/d/B00V2TSN34/ref=mp_s_a_1_1?qid=1428117796&sr=1-1&keywords=The+cove%2C+Anna+Leavy

    • Gigi says:

      Thank you Millie, going to look up for Anna’s book. I have read books from an Australian writer Kerry Greenwood and her writing is very different but I enjoyed them.
      Going off line, what a nice way to end my evening. Bonsoir mes dames.

  8. Anna says:

    Love Miss Fisher, Kerry Greenwood’s creation. I haven’t read the books but the TV series is fabulous.

  9. Millie says:

    Anna! I’m so proud of you. Good girl for telling Gigi about your book. :-D
    We must have been typing at the same time. Speaking of time… It’s almost midnight, and soon my coach will turn into a pumpkin so I must start my lights off. Drat! You see, Gigi, a few of us have a sleep cycle that’s a bit (well, actually, a lot) off. And I’m trying to shift it back to a more ‘socially acceptable’ time simply because I miss out on my husband’s company when he is home and awake. The things we do for love!

    For the Christians in this group, I wish you a Happy Easter, for the Jewish, I wish you a Happy Passover and for all others, have a great weekend.

  10. Anna says:

    Happy Easter, Happy Passover everyone.
    My family arrived home from the Easter Show in possession of many Show bags and assorted soft toys won on side show alley. Eek. It’s the Giant Rasta Banana that is giving me nightmares….something about the teeth!

  11. Julie says:

    Phew! Every day, lately, we’ve added a page of comments. How wonderful! Gigi – welcome! None of us here speaks much French (I believe, though people here tend to surprise you), but we all know a few indispensable words – “Gamache” “Jean Guy”, hee hee. We have been hanging around the Bistro since the end of last summer when we did the “reread” of all Louise’s books, and as we got to know one another, it’s been great fun! Both Millie and Anna have mentioned that Louise has inspired them to write – and our Anna has already finished her first book, and so far, we are loving it! And Millie – it’s not a race – we’ll be here when you’re ready… :D

    Lovely, lovely place, the Bistro.

  12. Millie says:

    Julie, thanks for your kind words that ‘it’s not a race’… But most importantly the “we’ll be here” is such a comfort.

    I’m not strong on the French language, either. But I think I picked up a few curse words in French which Jean-Guy uses. Funny, I’ve never consider words as being good or bad – they are just words. It’s individuals who give them a particular meaning and decide they are going to be offended by them that fascinates me. Granted there’s a time and place for everything, but language can be so complex.

    I’ll never forget a story my mom tells of when she first met my dad’s family. Both spoke Spanish, you’d think no problem, but my dad’s family had moved from Spain to Argentina, my mom’s family moved from Spain to Puerto Rico where her dad was a ‘big band’ conductor… Well, she asked if she could ‘take’ a piece of bread. She was trying to be so polite. Unfortunately for her, the particular word she used, tho perfectly correct, had an entirely different connotation in Argentina – to ‘take’ a woman against her will’… Awkward!

    Good, modern Spanish dictionaries now include a generally accepted definition, but also the connotations or sometimes the entirely different meaning in specific Spanish speaking countries. And there are lots.

    Which reminds me of the words of a song from the musical “Into the Woods” which I remember mentioning, while discussing TLWH, that I loved because ‘there is always more after the end’.
    “…Careful the things you say, children will listen.
    “Careful the things you do. Children will see and learn…”

    Did anyone see the film adaptation of “Into the Woods” which was released last Christmas? My sons and husband waited till I returned home after my dad’s passing, and we went to see it together. They knew how much that would mean to me. I had invited them all over for dinner before family night at the movies. (My daughter-in-law’s mom graciously watched our two adorable granddaughters…) To my surprise, during dinner my elder son, who has a lovely tenor voice, began to sing a number the two princes sing. It’s called ‘Agony’ but very funny. My younger son joined in! It had been more than 7 years since they heard me play the soundtrack at ‘home’. I laughed and asked them if I played it THAT often that they remembered every word? I only got a ‘you have to ask,” stare from each son. We loved the movie adaptation. That is so rare as evidenced by most people’s reaction to ‘Still Life’ in film. Did anyone who saw it, like it?

    • Julie says:

      Into the Woods is not one I’m familiar with, and I’ve found the recent “supernatural” tendencies in film to be kind of boring. I recorded Salem thinking it was going to be about the shameful burning of “witches” in the 1600’s, but instead, it became clear it was going to be more fantastical, right from the get-go, and I deleted all of season one in one click. I don’t watch the TV shows based on fairy tales for the same reason, and have put Into the Woods kind of in that category for myself, even though I know it’s a Sondheim musical – I just figured they’d ruin it, but it sounds like they didn’t. I might see if I can find it to watch…

      I did watch Still Life – just HAD to, even though I’d been warned that Louise, who had been watching them as they made it, had to kind of wash her hands of the whole thing. For me, the real problem was the casting. I could have accepted Gamache, and I quite liked Jean Guy, but not one single other person was properly cast as far as I could see. Ruth might be your grandmother with a toothache, Clara was young and pretty, as was Nichol and Lacoste (almost interchangeable), and worst of all – Myrna. She has to have been there – yet I don’t even remember what she looked like! Can you believe that? Myrna????? forgettable???? Crazy! Neither Gabri nor Olivier stood out, either! These people are so full of personality, and it just doesn’t come across. It was left to stand on the story of the murder, and it really didn’t make it that way.

      • Anna says:

        The movie just didn’t quite work and I think you have hit the nail on the head. The characters just weren’t there. They were all abit bland and nondescript not rich and detailed. I know it must be hard to bring books to life because so much of the detail is in our heads and we all see slightly differently.

      • Nancy Miller says:

        I only saw Still Life once but I do remember Myrna. Why?? For the same reason you forgot her. She was skinny!! Totally off. (As was Clara who’s hair was lovely with no crumbs anywhere!)

        • Anna says:

          I forgot Myrna was skinny in the movie…and Clara was far too pretty and together. Bland is the only word that comes to mind. And Louise’s characters are anything but bland.

  13. Anna says:

    I didn’t get to see the movie of Into the Woods. I wanted to. I am going to see if we can watch it on Apple TV but it might only be me who is interested!

    I can feel myself slipping into a chocolate coma. The Easter Bunny appears to have been under the misapprehension that a dozen children live in this house as that is the amount of chocolate we have discovered this morning. I even got a chocolate platypus! First time for everything although chocolate Bilbies are common…small Australian marsupial. Problem is rabbits are a menace to farmers so the chocolate industry has looked, unsuccessfully, for alternatives.

    It is definitely not a race Millie. Stories come when they are ready to be told. In the meantime all of life goes into the melting pot inside your head and your heart from whence the stories come. There is a great mix of ingredients inside you already. Maybe you are waiting on a key spice for the mix to be ready??

  14. Anna says:

    For the Miss Fisher enthusiasts:

    About the TV show

    http://www.vogue.com.au/culture/features/behind+the+set+of+miss+fishers+murder+mysteries+with+essie+davis,17077

    http://www.abc.net.au/tv/phrynefisher/classroom/MissFisher_ConceptDocument.pdf

    About the author and the books. Note the comments about why Miss Fisher wouldn’t get to be a TV or movie series, this interview predates the TV series. The expense is quoted. Is was very expensive, in Australian terms, to bring Miss Fisher to TV as they made such an effort to be authentic.

    http://phrynefisher.com/Kerrygreenwood.html

  15. Millie says:

    Oh Anna, you make me giggle. And look forward to when my granddaughters are old enough to hunt for Easter Eggs. Maybe next year?

    As for a missing spice… I can think of a major one. Finish transferring all my files from my (very) old PC to my shiny ‘new’ Mac and learning my way around the fruit of temptation without being tempted to play with all the neat apps on it? But then, maybe I just need time to play with my not so new anymore ‘toy’. ‘Life’ keeps interrupting my play time, though. I didn’t learn my way around a PC in one sitting. Haven’t found those photos of my bookcases yet either. Switching hasn’t been the piece of cake I thought it would be, but I found a book called Switching from PC to Mac that’s helping. My sons tease me constantly, “Mom has a book for that!”
    Then I need to slog through a book in excruciatingly formal Spanish to mine for bits of info about a 15th century Pope of whom very little has been written but whose story I personally want to know more… Only I need to sit with a fat dictionary to get through each sentence. I find it frustrating when I read the definition and think, “well why didn’t you just say so!” LOL… Granted, my vocabulary in Spanish has shrunk in the last 40 years but this author maxed out my mom’s excellent vocabulary by the second paragraph. I wish it was in Kindle format so I could more easily look up definitions but it took me years to find it and had to order it from Spain. I’ll get through it though. Eventually.

    See, in my mind, this 15th Century ‘Pope’ is an ancestor of the main female character and she’s discovering the ‘why’ of many of her family’s peculiar traditions along with the ‘why’ someone is trying to kill her…

    But my biggest worry is WHO would care about a 15thC Pope (who is glossed over even by the Catholic Church), who happened to be born in Spain, other than ME? It’s not a book about religion, but about mysteries & intrigues and betrayals and mistrust. And it’s a story about loosing faith and faithfulness and love and trust and never giving up, but sometimes learning to let go of the past – of what no longer serves you and finding life does go on. And it’s a story about believing in oneself, set in present day time…

    There. That’s the most I’ve EVER told anyone about the story in my mind.

    • Julie says:

      Millie – this sounds fascinating! You have to keep going. I think lots of people will be interested in this pope when you “flesh him out”. Think how many people were interested in a nut who was looking for the body of Champlain? Turns out that character was fictional, though based on a real person who died not so long ago, never having found the burial place, unfortunately…

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