A Great Reckoning (Book 12)

Book Summary

When an intricate old map is found stuffed into the walls of the bistro in Three Pines, it at first seems no more than a curiosity. But the closer the villagers look, the stranger it becomes.

Given to Armand Gamache as a gift the first day of his new job, the map eventually leads him to shattering secrets. To an old friend and older adversary. It leads the former Chief of Homicide for the Sûreté du Québec to places even he is afraid to go. But must.

And there he finds four young cadets in the Sûreté academy, and a dead professor. And, with the body, a copy of the old, odd map.

Everywhere Gamache turns, he sees Amelia Choquet, one of the cadets. Tattooed and pierced. Guarded and angry. Amelia is more likely to be found on the other side of a police line-up. And yet she is in the academy. A protégée of the murdered professor.

The focus of the investigation soon turns to Gamache himself and his mysterious relationship with Amelia, and his possible involvement in the crime. The frantic search for answers takes the investigators back to Three Pines and a stained glass window with its own horrific secrets.

For both Amelia Choquet and Armand Gamache, the time has come for a great reckoning.

Cultural Reference Discussion

Join us in a discussion around a creative work of cultural significance from this book.

Cultural Inspirations from A Great Reckoning

It strikes a man more dead than a great reckoning in a little room.
—William Shakespeare (Epigraph, A Great Reckoning)

The Shakespeare quote comes from the comedic play, As You Like It (Act III, Scene III), and is believed to have been written in 1599. The line is a direct reference to Christopher Marlowe’s death which occurred six years earlier under extremely suspicious circumstances.

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The Nature of the Feast Archive

In 2016, we cooked our way through the Inspector Gamache series. Every two weeks we posted a recipe from the world of Three Pines and opened a discussion around that recipe. The archive of the recipe and discussion can be found in The Nature of the Feast Archive page.